Haunting’s in St. Louis It is Halloween Time

4 Comments

The Lemp Mansion

The Lemp Mansion, now a restaurant and bed and breakfast, is considered among the most haunted buildings in the United States. Members of the Lemp family, each dying under tragic circumstances, remain in the mansion. William J. Lemp, founder of Lemp Brewery, purchased the mansion for his family in 1876. In 1901, William’s favorite son, Frederick Lemp, died under mysterious circumstances. Three years later, William J. Lemp, still grieving for his son, committed suicide. William J. Lemp, Jr. then became president of the Lemp Brewery and committed suicide 18 years later. His son, William Lemp III, died of a heart attack in 1943 at 42 years of age. William Jr.’s brother, Charles, also committed suicide. The ghosts of the Lemp Mansion are documented by numerous paranormal investigations.

 

We all remember the movie the “Exorcist ” this was based off it.

Alexian Brothers Hospital was originally located 3933 S. Broadway in St. Louis, MO. It has since been demolished and the hospital was rebuilt at its present location. In 1949, the exorcism that was the basis of William Peter Blatty’s novel “The Exorcist” occurred at Alexian Brothers Hospital in St. Louis, MO. The exorcism was performed on a 13-year-old boy, Robbie, whose parents brought him to St. Louis after months of dealing with the boy’s terrors. The exorcism was successful; however, when Robbie left Alexian Brothers Hospital, the room he had stayed in was permanently locked. Although the Alexian Brothers kept it secret, hospital workers involved in the case shared information about the things they heard and saw during the several-week ordeal. Notably, cold air emanated from the locked room, even though the hospital was warm everywhere else. Electrical problems plagued the surrounding rooms. After some time, the entire section of the hospital where the exorcism took place was closed. Alexian Brothers Hospital was demolished after a new hospital was built at 2645 Keokuk Street.

Alexian hospital

Zombie Road

On the bluffs above the Meramec River, there is a 2.3-mile stretch of old railroad tracks known as Zombie Road. The area surrounding Zombie Road once contained one of the largest Native American mound cities, and became a trail used by settlers crossing the country. The road was used by the Union Army during the Civil War, and last used by trucks from a quarry that closed in 1970. Zombie Road is famous for its “shadow people,” ghostly apparitions that watch the thrill seekers walking the dark trails.

http://www.paranormaltaskforce.com/zombiephotos4.html

images-1
http://www.paranormaltaskforce.com/zombiephotos4.html

Haunted Grist Mill and Hotel In Rural Missouri

Leave a comment

The town of Morse Mill, Missouri, was named for industrialist, John H. Morse, who settled in that area in 1847. Mr. Morse, a farmer and miller, came from Massachusetts and settled near the Big River about six miles northwest of Hillsboro.

Old Saw Mill in the Hay day

Old Grist Mill in the Hay day

Here is a Picture That I captured just a few weeks ago. It is still very pretty and Serene there.

Mill name-2

THIS IS THE CEDAR HILL MILL

peggy+franz/all” style=”font: 10pt arial; text-decoration: underline;”>autumn  peggy franz art

The Dam at Moorse Mill

The Dam at Big River near the Cedar Hill Mill

Old Mill  With someone Taking in the View

Morse was a contractor and builder and also known for building Gravois Road and the Sandy Creek Covered Bridge on Old Lemay Ferry Road. Built in 1872, the bridge still stands and is one of the few covered bridges still existing in Missouri. The bridge has been restored and a marker placed on the south end by the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce. It is considered an important historic landmark since it provided a necessary link for Jefferson County’s road system.

Winter Cover Bridge Name-

In his own era, Morse was a pioneer and developer. He was known to have strong conservative views, he fought for the Confederacy in the Civil War, and was later a state senator representing parts of Jefferson and Washington Counties. He did not live to see his little town become a playground for rich tourists as he had envisioned. 
He was also known by his Hotel which now is presumed haunted.

Moorse Mill Haunted House

Moorse Mill Haunted House

MORSE MILL HOTEL – MORSE MILL, MO –
Morse Mill Hotel was built by John H. Morse in the 1870s. The Hotel is a three-story frame house, built of maple and limestone, with a New Orleans-style balcony on the second floor, and a “widow’s walk.” There is an abandoned mill dam down the road on the Big River. Its use as a hotel began sometime in the 1920s, and saw the likes of Al Capone, Charles Lindbergh, Charlie Chaplain, and Jesse James and his gang. However, this is not what gives the Hotel its infamy. No, that would be Bertha Alice Williams Graham Gifford. Bertha Gifford was married to her second husband, Eugene Gifford, and lived her life at the Morse Mill Hotel as a simple housewife during the early 1900s. She loved to cook for people and make candy for children. Unfortunately, she also liked adding arsenic to her recipes. She was accused of murdering 17 people over 20 years, including her first husband, Henry Graham. She was arrested in 1928, had a three-day trial in Union, MO, and was found guilty by reason of insanity. She was committed to the Missouri State Hospital #4, where she died in 1951.

Motel

For more information http://morsemillhotel.com/
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Morse-Mill-Haunted-Hotel/211903828849561
http://directoryofstlouis.com/blog/tour-the-haunted-morse-mill-hotel/

PLEASE ALWAYS REMEMBER THESE PHOTOGRAPHS ARE COPYRIGHT, Protected by United States Copyright and the Property of FranzsFeaturedFotos, Peggy Franz