HAPPY FRIDAY EVERYONE

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A SMILE FOR YOU ALL 🙂

The Colors of Twilight and Sunsets at Busch Memorial Conservation Area

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Sunsets, like childhood, are viewed with wonder not just because they are BEAUTIFUL but  because they are fleeting ~
Richard Paul Evans

Area highlights

Located in St. Charles County, the 6,987-acre August A. Busch Memorial Conservation Area is home to the St. Louis regional office, which includes a visitor center. With hiking trails and numerous hunting and fishing opportunities, the Busch Area is also your local connection to Missouri’s fish, forests, and wildlife.

Stop by for a fishing/hunting license, and stay to enjoy our exhibits, including a 1,300-gallon aquarium. Catch one of our free nature programs, go for a hike, enjoy a picnic, or wet a line in some of our 28 fishable lakes and ponds.

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Missouri’s Natural Beauty

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Well visited one of my favorite place to go which is Pickle Springs Park in St.Genevieve Missouri which also is very close to Farmington ,Missouri. 

 Explore a geological wonderland that is a National Natural Landmark.

 View scenic waterfalls and cool box canyons that harbor unusual plants and animals.

 Enjoy the blossoms of rose azalea along the sandstone valley in the spring.

 This scenic natural area contains all sorts of fascinating sandstone rock formations including box canyons and wet weather waterfalls. The sandstone rock here is the Lamotte sandstone that was formed from sandy beaches of a shallow ocean that existed here 500 million years ago. 

Missouri has so much to offer as far as beauty of nature and wildlife. 

 

Atlas Moth The Largest in the World

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Atlas moth  is is a large Moth found in the tropical and subtropical forests of Southeast Asia, southern China, common across the Malay archipelago, Thailand to Indonesia.

These moths are considered the largest in the world in terms of total wing surface area (65 square inches). In Hong Kong the Cantonese name translates as “snake’s head moth“, referring to apical extension of the forewing, which bears a passing resemblance to a snake’s head.

Another interesting characteristic of the Atlas moth is that it doesn’t have fully developed mouth-parts, so it can’t feed…ever.

It survives on the larval fat reserves, throughout their entire 1-2 weeks adult lives.

I was at the Butterfly House here in St. Louis and I got to watch this Hatch from its cocoon. This was amazing!! so I thought I would share it with the Nature lovers! The very first Picture is what they look like when there wings dry.